SigNature T taggant and its genotyping and IT complements offer traceability and identity for cotton throughout the supply chain

Magazine for Textiles, Clothing, Leather and Technology

Applied DNA Receives $1 Million Order to Supply SigNature® T Molecular Taggant for 2019-2020 Cotton Harvest Season 

Applied DNA Sciences Inc. a leader in PCR-based DNA manufacturing for product authenticity and traceability solutions, announced today that it received a $1 million order to supply SigNature® T taggant for cotton in the upcoming 2019 – 2020 ginning season which begins in October. The Company’s SigNature T technology, paired with its genotyping and digital systems, will be used to tag, test and track the Pima cotton variety grown in the San Joaquin Valley, California that is sold under the PimaCott® brand nationwide and online by the largest home goods retailer in the U.S.

“We are pleased that the value of forensic traceability and genotyping for cotton continues to translate to recurring demand for tagged cotton across the home textile category,” said Dr. James A. Hayward, president and CEO of Applied DNA. “We believe the SigNature T platform, combined with our partner’s high standards in supply chain quality practices, assure them brand protection and label-claim compliance for retailers and consumers.”

The SigNature T system utilizes fully-automated DNA Transfer Systems in the “Industrial Internet of Things” design to ensure origin tagging process quality and as a basis for monitoring shipments, receipts and contract compliance. In addition to our Pima business, systems are installed in American Upland and Egyptian varietal cotton gins. While the SigNature T analysis confirms the traceability mark, a patented fiberTyping® analysis confirms cotton species from fiber to finished goods. Since 2014, and including the cotton tagged with this order, over 250 million pounds of cotton will have been tagged as the key to a total end-to-end traceability solution that is substantiated by forensic test data. Over 7,000 DNA tests have been conducted on cotton during the past five years.

Source: https://adnas.com/